Keep in touch with what is going on in Ashley – sign up to the address list

We have created an email address list for the residents of Ashley which provides a quick and easy way to share information around.

It has been used recently to send around information on planning issues, news and updates about the Travellers on the playing field, meetings of the Parish Council and the meeting last week to discuss the future of the Church. News and information can be sent out quickly and cheaply and the use of the address list complements the village website (ashleyvillage.org.uk) and the Facebook page (Ashley Post).

Email addresses are kept secure and are not shared with others.

To add your address to the list, please email us on ashley.cambs@yahoo.co.uk

Thank you.

Speedwatch in Ashley – Join our team of volunteers

Almost everyone in Ashley that I speak with is concerned about the speed that vehicles pass through the village. A recent speed survey showed that around 30% of vehicles significantly break the speed limit. A few cars have been recorded at more than 50mph.

Our Speedwatch team is looking for more volunteers so that we can deter drivers from speeding through Ashley. The scheme is supported by Cambridgeshire Police Force and full training is given.

We use speed detection equipment to identify vehicles that go too fast and report their details to the police. We can operate at any time within daylight hours and try to organise sessions during the busiest times – that way having the biggest impact. We work in teams of 3 so it also tends to be a pleasant social time as we get to know other people in the village and catch up on the village news.

To find out more please email me on our Speedwatch email address, csw.ashley@yahoo.co.uk , or call me on 01638 730459.

Sarah Howell

Parish Council Views on a Suggested Site – Land to the north of Potters Cottage, Church Street Ashley

Village Size and Development

Ashley is a small village which has around 240 dwellings (including outlying areas of the parish) and a popula-tion of just over 600. (Note that this is contrary to the EADC notes about Ashley in the current draft Local Plan.) Adding an extra 30 dwellings on this proposed site in a short time frame would significantly increase the size of the village and would put a significant strain on the village resources and roads.

2011 Census data indicates that 78% of work journeys are made by car, with 9% by foot, 8% working from home, 2% by bus and 1% by bicycle, reflecting Ashley’s rural location.

Much of Ashley is also a Conservation Area, which was created so that the the existing ‘look and feel’ of the village would be preserved.

Flood Risk

Although the site is not identified as being at any particular risk of flooding, there are historic events when run-off from the site has flooded gardens in Church Street and caused the village pond to overflow, which inun-dates the drains and then causes flooding between Ashley and Newmarket on the B1063. This problem has been prevented from causing a problem by improving drainage from an existing old unlined pond into the vil-lage pond, but mainly by regular ploughing of the field.

There is an existing problem where the bottom of Mill Road is flooded from runoff from the site. This has on occasion caused damage to cars that have been parked in the affected area. Mill Road was last flooded in June this year.

Public Transport

Ashley, in parallel with other villages in the area such as Cheveley, has a poor bus service. There are daily buses into Newmarket at the beginning and end of the working day, and a few random services on other days. There is no direct service to Bury St Edmunds.

Consequently, there will be significant extra traffic and most will pass westwards along Church Street towards Newmarket, which will all pass through the already problematic junction between Church Street and High Street. The Highways Dept have already been involved with the Parish Council regarding this problem, and no obvious solution has been found.

Site Access

The proposed site access has poor visibility along Church Street and presently is well under the required 43m located 2.4m from the road edge. Visibility can only be improved by removing hedging and trees that are lo-cated in a conservation area, which will have an impact on the aesthetics along Church Street, particularly in the corner of the graveyard where a tree would have to be removed.

Visibility will also be reduced because of on-street resident parking, which fills most of the area to the west of the access along Church Street. We would strenuously resist any parking controls in this area, and in any event would worry about how such controls would be enforced.

Due to poor public transport facilities the majority of newcomers would inevitably use their cars for most jour-neys, including access to village facilities. Car journeys would be essential for access to medical services, shops and employment, the nearest of which is 3.5 miles away in Newmarket. The proposed number of new houses would possibly generate up to twice the number of vehicles which would exacerbate an already diffi-cult traffic and parking problem along Church Street, – a narrow road but nevertheless, the principal thorough-fare for traffic from the outlying villages of Gazeley and Dalham travelling to and from Newmarket.

The junction of Church Street/Newmarket Road and High Street by The Crown public house has already been identified as a hazardous junction for road users and pedestrians. Consultation with the Highways Agency has not found a solution. The Parish Council is deeply concerned about the danger and difficulty that would be created by even more cars trying to use this junction.

The vehicular turn out from the proposed access next to Potters Cottage would be extremely dangerous due to lack of visibility caused by parked cars and the bend in the road. Though the bend is slight it makes it quite impossible to see on coming cars from the right. In addition, St Mary’s Church lies adjacent to the site and can also generate considerable extra parking resulting from its services, including wedding and funerals. The Church has no off street parking facilities. There is also no primary school in the village and the nearest at Cheveley, (1.5 miles distant) is currently over-subscribed. If the development were to go ahead this is likely to result in many more home to school car journeys by car.

2011 Census data indicates that 78% of work journeys are made by car, with 9% by foot, 8% working from home, 2% by bus and 1% by bicycle, reflecting Ashley’s rural location.

St Mary’s Church also causes significant extra parking at random times, such as weddings and funerals. At these times a significant length of Church Street can have nose to tail parking, which effectively reduces the road to a single file.

Schools

The designated primary school is in Cheveley, which is about 1.5 miles away. However, we believe that this school is already over subscribed and has no room for further expansion.

The closest secondary school in East Cambs is in Bottisham, which is a journey of about 11 miles each way.

Doctor’s Surgery

The closest surgery is in Newmarket, over 3.5 miles away. The irregular bus service is not really appropriate for appointments, so any visit would necessitate a car journey.

Shops

There is one small convenience shop in the village. Although it is well stocked and has good opening hours, the amount of produce provided is to some extent limited. Family shopping would need to be in Newmarket or further, which necessitates a car journey.

There is also a pub and a restaurant in the village.

Employment

There is little employment in the village for residents, with only a few people who live and work within the vil-lage. Adjacent Studs are generally staffed by people who either live on site, or who commute from elsewhere.

Landlocked Site

The site adjoins the Conservation Area, where the area around the pond in particular is considered the centre of the village. The majority of any traffic to and from this proposed development would have to pass through this area.

The layout of the site would mean there would be a short unpopulated access road at right angles to Church Street with houses then being located on the area that is behind existing houses. This would result in a site that is effectively landlocked with only one access. This differs from other older developments in the village where the sites are more rectangular and open, with the houses integrating in more easily with the rest of the village.

The proposed housing density is also well above that which already exists along Church Street, which would also negatively impact the aesthetics of that part of the village, in particular the view from the existing houses on Church Street and the view of the village from the top of Mill Road.

The site is prime farmland, which is intensively farmed.

Impact of Development

The impact on the village of developing this site will be very significant. Heavy vehicles that will be used dur-ing construction will have a serious impact on congestion, and because of the narrow roads there will lilkely be significant damage to verges and the edge of the roads. Residents parked cars will also be vulnerable to damage.

If the site was completed, the influx of so many extra residents on what is a small village with a small village infrastructure would also be very disruptive, and is likely to cause significant degradation in the quality of life for existing residents.

The development of both this site and 01/01 would irrevocably degrade the whole character of the village.

Full document

To view the full document please click here.

Parish Council Views on a Suggested Site – Land to the south and east of Elms Farm, Ashley

Village Size and Proposed Development

Ashley is a small village which has around 240 dwellings (including outlying areas of the parish) and a popula-tion of just over 600. (Note that this is contrary to the EADC notes about Ashley in the current draft Local Plan.) Adding an extra 30 dwellings on this proposed site in a short time frame would significantly increase the size of the village and would put a significant strain on the village resources and roads.

2011 Census data indicates that 78% of work journeys are made by car, with 9% by foot, 8% working from home, 2% by bus and 1% by bicycle, reflecting Ashley’s rural location. This demonstrates that there will be significant increase in traffic caused by the proposed development.

Much of Ashley is also a Conservation Area, which was created so that the the existing ‘look and feel’ of the village would be preserved.

Public Transport

Ashley, in parallel with other villages in the area such as Cheveley, has a poor bus service. There are daily buses into Newmarket at the beginning and end of the working day, and a few random services on other days. There is no direct service to Bury St Edmunds.

Consequently, there will be significant extra traffic and most will pass westwards along Church Street towards Newmarket, which will all pass through the already problematic junction between Church Street and High Street. The Highways Dept have already been involved with the Parish Council regarding this problem, and no obvious solution has been found.

Site Access

The proposed access to the site is just around the corner from a sharp bend and is therefore considered un-safe for traffic turning into Church Street. Church Street itself, although the main thoroughfare for traffic com-ing to and from Gazeley and Dalham, is narrow and is itself frequently obstructed by parked cars. The main route out of the village has to pass through the junction of Church St/Newmarket Road and the High Street, by The Crown public house. This has already been identified as a hazardous junction with poor visibility. Consultation with the Highways Agency has not found a solution to this problem and the Parish Council is deeply concerned that the hazard would be multiplied with many more cars passing each day.

Due to poor public transport facilities the majority of newcomers would inevitably use their cars for most jour-neys, including access to village facilities. Car journeys would be essential for access to medical services, shops and employment, the nearest of which is 3.5 miles away in Newmarket. The proposed number of new houses would possibly generate up to twice the number of vehicles which would exacerbate an already diffi-cult traffic and parking problem along Church Street, – a narrow road but nevertheless, the principal thorough-fare for traffic from the outlying villages of Gazeley and Dalham travelling to and from Newmarket.

The junction of Church Street/Newmarket Road and High Street by The Crown public house has already been identified as a hazardous junction for road users and pedestrians. Consultation with the Highways Agency has not found a solution. The Parish Council is deeply concerned about the danger and difficulty that would be created by even more cars trying to use this junction.

2011 Census data indicates that 78% of work journeys are made by car, with 9% by foot, 8% working from home, 2% by bus and 1% by bicycle, reflecting Ashley’s rural location, which supports the expectation of con-siderable extra traffic through the village and connecting roads.

St Mary’s Church also causes significant extra parking at random times, such as weddings and funerals. At these times a significant length of Church Street can have nose to tail parking, which effectively reduces the road to a single file.

Schools

The designated primary school is in Cheveley, which is about 1.5 miles away. However, we believe that this school is already over subscribed and has no room for further expansion.

The closest secondary school in East Cambs is in Bottisham, which is a journey of about 11 miles each way.

Doctor’s Surgery

The closest surgery is in Newmarket, over 3.5 miles away. The irregular bus service is not really appropriate for appointments, so any visit would necessitate a car journey.

Shops

There is one small convenience shop in the village. Although it is well stocked and has good opening hours, the amount of produce provided is to some extent limited. Family shopping would need to be in Newmarket or further, which necessitates a car journey.

There is also a pub and a restaurant in the village.

Employment

There is little employment in the village for residents, with only a few people who live and work within the vil-lage. Adjacent Studs are generally staffed by people who either live on site, or who commute from elsewhere.

Landlocked Site

The site adjoins the Conservation Area, where the area around the pond in particular is considered the centre of the village. The majority of any traffic to and from this proposed development would have to pass through this area.

The layout of the site would mean there would be quite a long access road to the site of new dwellings. This would result in a site that is quite isolated from most of the village and would be completely landlocked with only one access. This differs from other older developments in the village where the sites are more rectangu-lar and open, with the houses integrating in more easily with the rest of the village.

The proposed housing density is also well above that which already exists along Church Street, and would give a very different view of the village when approaching from the East along Dalham Road.

Creeping Development

This site is situated in open countryside close to the edge of the village and represents only a small proportion of the landowners holding in the area. The Parish Council is concerned that if this site is approved, the princi-ple of development in the area will have been established, causing the adjoining plots to become vulnerable to a creeping urbanisation.

Drought Relief Pipeline in the Area

It is understood that an Environment Agency pipeline, part of the London drought relief scheme, passes under this site and will have various restrictions in place on the development that can be done adjacent to the pipe-line. The exact route is not known.

The site is on prime farmland, which currently is used for grazing.

Impact of Development

The impact on the village of developing this site will be very significant. Heavy vehicles that will be used dur-ing construction will have a serious impact on congestion, and because of the narrow roads there will lilkely be significant damage to verges and the edge of the roads. Residents parked cars will also be vulnerable to damage.

If the site was completed, the influx of so many extra residents on what is a small village with a small village infrastructure would also be very disruptive, and is likely to cause significant degradation in the quality of life for existing residents.

The development of both this site and 01/02 would irrevocably degrade the whole character of the village.

Full document

To view the full document please click here.

Notes of a special consultative meeting held at Ashley Pavilion on 20th June

The meeting was chaired by Olive Oakervee, Chairman of the Parish Council and attended by 4 councillors and 23 parishioners.

The proposals for new housing development in the village had been initiated following a call to developers by East Cambridgeshire District Council who had requested details of new sites which were thought suitable for housing development. This call was made as part of the process to revise the existing Local Plan for East Cambridgeshire which had been rejected by Central Government on the grounds of insufficient housing provision. East Cambs DC had been asked to produce a new plan with provision for an additional 4,300 houses across the District.

Cllr Oakervee confirmed that Fairhaven Estates were proposing to develop a stud farm behind Potters Cottage (Church Street). In addition, two new sites for housing had been proposed: these comprised a development of 30 houses behind Potters Cottage and one of 37 houses on land at the rear of Elms Farm.

The purpose of this meeting was to canvass local opinion on these proposals. To view the full document please click here.

Ashley Parish Council has an immediate vacancy for a Parish Clerk

9 hours per week, home based.

Ashley is a relatively small village with 485 voters on the electoral register. The precept currently stands at £16830.

The Clerk works from home and attends monthly council meetings which are generally in the evening. Own transport is essential if the Clerk is not a village resident. Motor mileage allowance and travel time would be paid where own transport is used.

Further details about the post including salary etc., are attached.

Applications, accompanied by CV may be sent in writing to Clllr Olive Oakervee, Chair, Ashley Parish Council, Ashley Hall, 25 The Green, Ashley, Newmarket, CB8 9EB. Applications may also be sent by e-mail to olive@oakervee.co.uk

Closing date for applications: 23 June 2016

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Could you be Special?

Do you want to do something special for yourself, your community and your employer?

Do you want to gain invaluable experience and training to achieve your personal or professional goals?

Why not join the Special Constabulary and find out just how much you are capable of?

Your employer may even give you time off to volunteer under the employer supported policing scheme.

What do Specials do?

As a Special Constable you will work with us to help keep the people within your community safe, ensuring that your community, and the wider Cambridgeshire area, is a place that people feel proud to call home. In return we will provide you with invaluable experience and training to achieve your personal or professional goals.

Special Constables provide vital support to a whole range of policing activities and have the same powers and equipment as regular police officers.

Have you got what it takes?

The Special Constabulary welcomes applications from people from all walks of life and backgrounds. The kind of people we need have good life skills and experience, plus strong community awareness.

How to apply

For more information about becoming a Special, or to apply, visit www.cambs.police.uk/recruitment/Specials or email specials@cambs.pnn.police.uk

Special Constable Kayleigh Minor’s story

“I work alongside a regular officer on every shift. I go to every incident with them no matter whether it be a domestic, a collision or a call to an animal in the road.

“I love the feeling at the end of a shift knowing that I have made a difference to someone’s life or I have helped take someone who isn’t so nice off the streets. I also love the adrenaline of the job and having to think on my feet.

“I highly recommend volunteering as a Special. It gives you an insight into the police force and the role of an officer but it also gives you the ability to deal with different situations and to learn new skills.

“If you have some spare time and are wondering what to do with it I would absolutely recommend joining the Specials.”

View additional information

Ashley Pavilion Trust March 2016

Already this year the Trustees have been working hard on your behalf, to keep pace with the rigours of life in the 21st Century and comply with all the rules and regulations imposed upon us from the powers that be. This has involved many hours of research and innumerable emails and drafts and redrafts but we have managed to produce a Health and Safety dossier to be proud of! All that remains now is to ensure general compliance and this, dear readers, is down to you, or at least to those of you who kindly hire the Pavilion for all the many and varied activities it hosts and supports. We are very aware that all this red tape can seem very irritating but unfortunately it is a necessary evil these days and your co-operation will be much appreciated.

Newcomers to the village might like to know that the Pavilion plays host to a number of Clubs and Groups; there is a Bridge Club, a Carpet Bowls Club and three Art Groups and a Drop-In meeting on the first Wednesday of the month. Michelle’s fun-packed Moves Fitness Class on Saturday mornings is a great way to start the weekend and the super-fit could complete the week with an Hour of Power on Friday mornings. Full details are on the last page of the magazine.

It can’t have escaped anyone’s notice that this year Her Majesty the Queen is celebrating her 90th Birthday and Ashley is beginning to gear up to put together a memorable event on Sunday 12 June and play its part. Ashley Fundraisers are planning to hold a Fundraising event to help meet the costs.

The Village Fête will be held at the Recreation Ground as usual on Sunday 7 August and we hear that plans are already afoot for (quote) “making this the best Fête yet” and the Village Quiz Nights are unmissable, great fun and well-attended. The first will be held on Saturday 4 June and as always, it is wise to book a table at the first opportunity. Following on from the success of last year’s event, there are rumours of a repeat Apple Pressing Day later in the year (date to be advised).

We were sorry that the enjoyable children’s messy play sessions were short-lived due to conflicting family commitments. Anyone wishing to start up another such group would be made welcome. We’re here for the community.

A couple of reminders for you:

To book an event at the Pavilion please contact Debbie Garrity on 01638 730263 or e.mail her on: debbiegarrity@hotmail.com

Ashley 100 Club, the village lottery, always welcomes new members and those new to the village might like to know that the annual subscription is still only £12 per member!! To join the 100 Club and have a chance of winning £30, £20 or £10 in the monthly draw, contact me on 01638 731013 or email: ap888@btinternet.com As a bonus, 100 Club Members receive a one-off £5.00 reduction from the fee when hiring the Pavilion. What’s not to like? We are very grateful to all our faithful members for their continued support.

Alison Pascoe